Intermittent fasting, Paleolithic, or Mediterranean diets in the real world: exploratory secondary analyses of a weight-loss trial that included choice of diet and exercise

We recently reported no differences in weight, body composition, blood markers, exercise, or eating behavior in a randomized controlled trial investigating how different monitoring strategies influenced weight loss over 1 y

Michelle R Jospe; Melyssa Roy; Rachel C Brown; Jillian J Haszard; Kim Meredith-Jones; Louise J Fangupo; Hamish Osborne; Elizabeth A Fleming; Rachael W Taylor

2019

Scholarcy highlights

  • Given that obesity and metabolic dysfunction drive most chronic diseases, there is a need for simple, sustainable, and safe dietary approaches that promote good dietary choices, effective weight control, and favorable metabolic outcomes
  • We recently reported no differences in weight, body composition, blood markers, exercise, or eating behavior in a randomized controlled trial investigating how different monitoring strategies influenced weight loss over 1 y
  • SWIFT is registered with the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry, and ethical approval was obtained from the University of Otago Human Ethics Committee
  • There were no differences in overall diet scores between diets at 6 mo
  • Diet scores at 12 mo were comparable between groups
  • At 12 mo, weight loss was −4.0 kg in IF, −2.8 kg in Mediterranean, and −1.8 kg in Paleo participants
  • This study provides evidence that, in the real-world environment, IF and Mediterranean diets can be effective for weight loss, and any of these dietary approaches may positively influence health
  • Food choice while following fasting diets is important given that, our SWIFT participants did manage to reduce their energy intake, they consumed less fiber and a greater proportion of ultra-processed foods than the other diets, potentially reducing any favorable impact of fasting on blood glucose

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