Pervasive Indels and Their Evolutionary Dynamics after the Fish-Specific Genome Duplication

We find that duplicate genes contain at least 25% more indels than single-copy genes

Baocheng Guo; Ming Zou; Andreas Wagner

2012

Scholarcy highlights

  • Genetic changes that facilitate the evolution of new traits are key to adaptive evolution
  • We required that duplicates must exist in at least two teleost species to increase the likelihood that the duplicates we study were truly part of the fish-specific genome duplication event
  • The Data Set To investigate the impact of indels on the evolution of duplicate genes, we analyzed 4,571 gene families containing at least one gene for all six of our species in the database HOMOLENS 4
  • We identified 609 genes that had only a single copy in all six species and 1,500 gene families likely to have been duplicated in the FSGD
  • In the five teleost genomes we study, more than 95% of singletons or duplicate genes carry indels compared with their human orthologs
  • We find that duplicate genes contain at least 25% more indels than single-copy genes
  • Figures like these demonstrate that indels are important sources of genetic variation in fish genomes
  • The likely reason why our observations are robust is that our analysis focuses on global genome-wide patterns of indel accumulation, and not on case studies of individual genes, which would be much more sensitive to gene prediction errors

Need more features? Save interactive summary cards to your Scholarcy Library.