Inclusion of ecological, economic, social, and institutional considerations when setting targets and limits for multispecies fisheries

We examine the inclusion of ecological, economic, social and institutional objectives in fisheries management, with the aim of progressing towards including all four objectives when setting management targets or limits, or both, for multispecies fisheries

Anna Rindorf

2016

Scholarcy highlights

  • Introduction to theSymposium: ‘Targets and Limits for Long Term Fisheries Management’ Quo VadimusInclusion of ecological, economic, social, and institutional considerations when setting targets and limits for multispecies fisheriesAnna Rindorf1*, Catherine M
  • Targets and limits are at the core of the scientific advice supporting decision-making of fisheries managers
  • Guidelines for the selection of targets and limits for long-term fisheries management have varied from the target of obtaining the maximum sustained yield, as formalized in the 1950s, to limits being set to avoid stock collapse in the 1980s and 1990s and back to maximizing sustainable yield as the largest yield that can be taken as a longterm average
  • Recent research has centred on defining targets to obtain the largest longterm average yield, and limits to ensure sustainability in an ecosystem context and identifying ‘satisficing’ management strategies (e.g
  • The majority of targets and limits continue to be defined on a single stock basis using stock-specific information only and excluding wider ecological, economic, social, and governance objectives
  • Based on the presentations and discussions at the ICES/Myfish symposium, we identified three areas of concern: the dominance of single species considerations in current fisheries management systems, decision frameworks with stated objectives of good governance, which are not delivering effectively, and the prevalence of natural sciences in the current advisory process
  • A major implication in recognizing the complex systems nature of fisheries is the need to promote governance concepts and decision-making frameworks to emphasize adaptive collaborative management and reduce barriers to the development of governance frameworks in which horizontal and vertical levels are well integrated

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