Serologic and Immunologic Responses in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome with Emphasis on the Epstein-Barr Virus

Patients with chronic fatigue syndrome can be diagnosed by clinical criteria, the lack of specific laboratory criteria delays or prevents the diagnosis and contributes to the quasi-disease status of the syndrome

James F. Jones

2011

Scholarcy highlights

  • Patients with chronic fatigue syndrome can be diagnosed by clinical criteria, the lack of specific laboratory criteria delays or prevents the diagnosis and contributes to the quasi-disease status of the syndrome
  • A resurgence of interest in the syndrome has followed reports suggesting that CFS may be associated with chronic active infection due to the Epstein-Barr virus
  • Analysis of reports to date shows that the mean titers of antibodies to viral capsid antigen and to early antigen are greater for patients with CFS than for healthy individuals; this is evident in cases for which serial samples were tested
  • These differences do not prove the cause of CFS
  • Cell-mediated immune responses in patients with CFS vary from study to study, and the number and function of natural killer cells in those patients are the most variable factors
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