Skeletal Muscle Capillarity during Hypoxia: VEGF and Its Activation

Breen, Ellen, Kechun Tang, Mark Olfert, Amy Knapp, and Peter Wagner

Ellen Breen

2008

Scholarcy highlights

  • Breen, Ellen, Kechun Tang, Mark Olfert, Amy Knapp, and Peter Wagner
  • Biol. 9:158–166, 2008.—Long-term exposure of humans and many mammals to hypoxia leads to the activation of several cellular mechanisms within skeletal muscles that compensate for a limited availability of cellular oxygen
  • One of these cellular mechanisms is to increase the expression of a subset of hypoxia-inducible genes, including the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor
  • VEGF gene expression is critically important for skeletal muscle angiogenesis and VEGF gene deletion in the mouse has been shown to greatly reduce skeletal muscle capillarity
  • This review will discuss the potential cellular signals or stimuli resulting from hypoxic exposure that could increase myocyte VEGF expression
  • These cellular signals include 1) a decrease in intracellular PO2, 2) skeletal muscle inflammation, associated cytokines and oxidative stress, and 3) an increase in AMP kinase activity and adenosine accompanying a reduction in cellular energy potential

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