Shall I Tell You Now or Later? Assimilation and Contrast in the Evaluation of Experiential Products

In a series of experiments, we find that when information is presented before consuming an experiential product, the information results in an assimilation effect such that consumers evaluate the same experience more positively when the product information is favorable compared to when it is unfavorable

Keith Wilcox; Anne L. Roggeveen; Dhruv Grewal

2011

Scholarcy highlights

  • This research demonstrates that the effect of product information on the evaluation of an experiential product depends on the order with which such information is presented
  • In a series of experiments, we find that when information is presented before consuming an experiential product, the information results in an assimilation effect such that consumers evaluate the same experience more positively when the product information is favorable compared to when it is unfavorable
  • We demonstrate that when such information is presented after consuming an experiential product, it results in a contrast effect such that consumers evaluate the same experience more negatively when the product information is favorable compared to when it is unfavorable
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