Role of the glycocalyx in regulating access of microparticles to apical plasma membranes of intestinal epithelial cells: implications for microbial attachment and oral vaccine targeting.

To test the accessibility of intestinal epithelial cell membranes to particulate antigens, we studied the effect of particle size on the ability of C T B to bind to GM1 on M cells and enterocytes

A Frey

2004

Scholarcy highlights

  • To test the accessibility of intestinal epithelial cell membranes to particulate antigens, we studied the effect of particle size on the ability of C T B to bind to GM1 on M cells and enterocytes
  • To test the accessibility o f intestinal cell membrane glycolipids to particulate ligands in the size ranges of viruses, bacteria, and particulate mucosal vaccines, CTB was used as model ligand in the form of probes of three distinct sizes: CTB-FITC, CTB-colloidal gold and red fluorescent CTB-P
  • Cryostat sections were viewed by fluorescence microscopy. Soluble CTB-FITC labeled the entire follicle-associated epithelium which contains both M cells and enterocytes. CTB-FITC labeled the surfacesof enterocytes on most villi, certain areas were devoid of label
  • W e have n o w shown that M cell~specific adherence may be due to enhanced accessibility of receptors on M cells and that the glycocalyx on apical membranes of both enterocytes and M cells plays an important role in limiting the adherence of particulate ligands to membrane glycolipids
  • Whereas soluble CTB-FITC bound to apical plasma membranes of all cell types in the rabbit small intestinal epithelium, CTB-colloidal gold adhered exclusively to Peyer's patch M cells and CTB-P failed to adhere to any epithelial cell surface
  • The barrier function of the intestinal epithelial cell glycocalyx may be important in limiting microbial adherence to membrane glycolipids, and in CTB-mediated targeting of vaccines to M cells and the mucosal immune system

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