Arts in health: considering language from an educational perspective in the United States

There has been tremendous progress linking the arts to health over the past five decades in the United States

Jill Sonke; Jenny B. Lee; Max Helgemo; Judy Rollins; Ferol Carytsas; Susan Imus; Patricia Dewey Lambert; Tina Mullen; Margery Pabst; Marcia Rosal; Heather Spooner; Ian Walsh

2017

Scholarcy highlights

  • There has been tremendous progress linking the arts to health over the past five decades in the United States
  • This descriptive study investigated the language used to reference the discipline informed by literature review, technical examination of language, a field survey and round-table dialog among educators
  • The literature review revealed “arts and health” as the most common term used, which was the preferred term for the greatest number of survey respondents, followed by “arts, health and well-being” and “arts in health”, confirming a general lack of consensus
  • A recommendation is made for use of the term “arts in health” to reference the discipline in educational programs in the U.S
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