A Clinical Trial of the Effects of Dietary Patterns on Blood Pressure

It is known that obesity, sodium intake, and alcohol consumption influence blood pressure

Lawrence J. Appel; Thomas J. Moore; Eva Obarzanek; William M. Vollmer; Laura P. Svetkey; Frank M. Sacks; George A. Bray; Thomas M. Vogt; Jeffrey A. Cutler; Marlene M. Windhauser; Pao-Hwa Lin; Njeri Karanja; Denise Simons-Morton; Marjorie McCullough; Janis Swain; Priscilla Steele; Marguerite A. Evans; Edgar R. Miller; David W. Harsha

2002

Scholarcy highlights

  • It is known that obesity, sodium intake, and alcohol consumption influence blood pressure
  • LEVATED blood pressure is a common problem in the United States
  • The occurrence of gastrointestinal symptoms was infrequent and similar for all the diets. This trial demonstrated that certain dietary patterns can favorably affect blood pressure in adults with average systolic blood pressures of less than 160 mm Hg and diastolic blood pressures of 80 to 95 mm Hg
  • The substantial increase in urinary phosphorus excretion with the combination diet suggests that the subjects in this group did consume more dairy products than the other participants
  • Following the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension combination diet might be an effective alternative to drug therapy in people with stage I hypertension and might prevent or delay the initiation of drug therapy in people with blood-pressure levels that straddle the thresholds for drug treatment
  • Efforts to reduce the prevalence of hypertension have focused on nonpharmacologic approaches that lower blood pressure

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