The Pathogenesis of Cardiac Cachexia

Hippocrates was perhaps the first to record this association between dropsy and cachexia: "The flesh is consumed and becomes water... the abdomen fills with water; the feet and legs swell; the shoulders, clavicles, chest, and thighs melt away."1 The mechanisms that may underlie the development of cardiac cachexia have not been defined precisely

Joseph G. Pittman; Phin Cohen

2010

Key concepts

Scholarcy highlights

  • THE striking degree of malnutrition that may accompany chronic congestive heart failure has been termed cardiac cachexia
  • Hippocrates was perhaps the first to record this association between dropsy and cachexia: "The flesh is consumed and becomes water ... the abdomen fills with water; the feet and legs swell; the shoulders, clavicles, chest, and thighs melt away."1 The mechanisms that may underlie the development of cardiac cachexia have not been defined precisely
  • Considerable knowledge has been gathered regarding the pathophysiology of congestive heart failure, it remains difficult to synthesize, from the many fragments of specialized information that are available, a

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