Renal aplasia is the predominant cause of congenital solitary kidneys

The present study showed that ultrasound in the neonatal period could identify the aplastic kidney, which had a reniform shape, not rudimentary, during the newborn period, and regressed rapidly thereafter

Masahiro Hiraoka

2003

Scholarcy highlights

  • Congenital solitary kidneys, which are susceptible to renal failure, have been considered mostly due to unilateral renal agenesis and partly due to renal aplasia
  • Primary screening detected 52 babies suspected of having small kidneys and one baby with a multicystic dysplastic kidney, but no baby with renal agenesis
  • The present study showed that ultrasound in the neonatal period could identify the aplastic kidney, which had a reniform shape, not rudimentary, during the newborn period, and regressed rapidly thereafter
  • These findings indicate that most renal agenesis diagnosed clinically far might more correctly be renal aplasia
  • Renal aplasia was found with an incidence of one in 1300, which was the same as the incidence of unilateral renal agenesis observed in an autopsy study and an ultrasound screening study of school children
  • In the newborn period these three small kidneys still had a reniform shape and their parenchyma appeared almost normal, except for small cysts in Patient 3, and there was no significant difference in size from the other small kidneys in Patients 5 to 9
  • The present study showed that ultrasound screening of the urinary tract of neonates could detect renal aplasia and that most of unilateral renal agenesis reported far might be more correctly classified as unilateral renal aplasia
  • Received for publication July 10, 2001 and in revised form November 15, 2001 Accepted for publication December 17, 2001

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