Biodistribution and toxicity of engineered gold nanoparticles: a review of in vitro and in vivo studies

Recent advances in wet chemical synthesis and biomolecular functionalization of gold nanoparticles have led to a dramatic expansion of their potential biomedical applications, including biosensorics, bioimaging, photothermal therapy, and targeted drug delivery

Nikolai Khlebtsov

2010

Scholarcy highlights

  • Recent advances in wet chemical synthesis and biomolecular functionalization of gold nanoparticles have led to a dramatic expansion of their potential biomedical applications, including biosensorics, bioimaging, photothermal therapy, and targeted drug delivery
  • Whereas about 80 reports on the in vivo biodistribution and in vitrocell toxicity of gold nanoparticles are available in the literature, there is lack of correlation between both fields and there is no clear understanding of intrinsic nanoparticle effects
  • The major obstacle is the significant discrepancy in experimental conditions under which biodistribution and toxicity effects have been evaluated. This critical review presents a detailed analysis of data on the in vitro and in vivo biodistribution and toxicity of most popular gold nanoparticles, including atomic clusters and colloidal particles of diameters from 1 to 200 nm, gold nanoshells, nanorods, and nanowires
  • Reproduced material should be attributed as follows: For reproduction of material from NJC: - Reproduced by permission of The Royal Society of Chemistry on behalf of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique and the RSC
  • For reproduction of material from PPS: - Reproduced by permission of The Royal Society of Chemistry on behalf of the European Society for Photobiology, the European Photochemistry Association, and RSC
  • For reproduction of material from all other RSC journals: - Reproduced by permission of The Royal Society of Chemistry

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