Central motor conduction studies in patients with spinal cord disorders: a review

In this narrative review, we have summarized studies demonstrating the usefulness of motor evoked potentials in the evaluation and management of many spinal cord disorders

R Nardone; Y Höller; A Thomschewski; P Höller; J Bergmann; S Golaszewski; F Brigo; E Trinka

2014

Scholarcy highlights

  • Neuroradiological examination represents the procedure of choice for the diagnosis of myelopathies; a correct interpretation of the data provided by neuroimaging can be achieved only if morphological findings are correlated with functional data
  • For careful assessment of the cervical spinal cord, motor evoked potentials should be recorded from multiple upper limb muscles corresponding to different segmental levels
  • The abnormality of central motor conduction for distal upper limb muscles and for all muscles supplied by more caudal myelomeres in the presence of a normal central motor conduction time for biceps muscles is frequently observed in cervical spondylotic myelopathy
  • The increased facilitation by the dynamic motor task showed the best reliability at 20% maximal voluntary contraction. In this narrative review, we have summarized studies demonstrating the usefulness of MEPs in the evaluation and management of many spinal cord disorders
  • It should be considered that the isolated finding of prolonged CMCT is not specific for any neurological disease, and that the facilitation of MEP responses usually induced by mild motor contraction is difficult or even impossible for the population of subjects with spinal cord disorders being partially or totally plegic
  • It should be considered that the isolated finding of prolonged central motor conduction time is not specific for any neurological disease, and that the facilitation of motor evoked potentials responses usually induced by mild motor contraction is difficult or even impossible for the population of subjects with spinal cord disorders being partially or totally plegic

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