Nitric oxide in the central nervous system: neuroprotection versus neurotoxicity

At the end of the 1980s, it was clearly demonstrated that cells produce nitric oxide and that this gaseous molecule is involved in the regulation of the cardiovascular, immune and nervous systems, rather than being a toxic pollutant

Vittorio Calabrese; Cesare Mancuso; Menotti Calvani; Enrico Rizzarelli; D. Allan Butterfield; Anna Maria Giuffrida Stella

2007

Scholarcy highlights

  • At the end of the 1980s, it was clearly demonstrated that cells produce nitric oxide and that this gaseous molecule is involved in the regulation of the cardiovascular, immune and nervous systems, rather than being a toxic pollutant
  • In the CNS, nitric oxide has an array of functions, such as the regulation of synaptic plasticity, the sleep–wake cycle and hormone secretion
  • Interesting is the role of nitric oxide as a Janus molecule in the cell death or survival mechanisms in brain cells
  • A landmark paper that demonstrates that EDRF, the early name given to NO, is involved in neurotransmission

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