A positive-negative mode of population covariation links brain connectivity, demographics and behavior

We investigated the relationship between individual subjects’ functional connectomes and 280 behavioral and demographic measures, in a single holistic multivariate analysis relating imaging to non-imaging data from 461 subjects in the Human Connectome Project

Stephen M Smith; Thomas E Nichols; Diego Vidaurre; Anderson M Winkler; Timothy E J Behrens; Matthew F Glasser; Kamil Ugurbil; Deanna M Barch; David C Van Essen; Karla L Miller

2015

Scholarcy highlights

  • We investigated the relationship between individual subjects’ functional connectomes and 280 behavioral and demographic measures, in a single holistic multivariate analysis relating imaging to non-imaging data from 461 subjects in the Human Connectome Project
  • 158 behavioral and demographic non-imaging subject measures from the same set of subjects were formed into a subject measure matrix
  • We found one significant mode of population variation that links a specific pattern of brain connectivity to a specific pattern of covariance between many behavioral and demographic subject measures
  • It is plausible that the canonical correlation analysis mode includes a neural correlate of g, but is a more general mode of positive brain function, and is more directly tied into to the underlying biology, given that it is driven both by structured population covariance in behavioral measures and by intrinsic brain connectivity
  • The original set of subject measures was all the behavioral, demographic and other measures reported in the “open access” and “restricted” subject information spreadsheets available from the Human Connectome Project database website
  • We identified just one CCA mode that related functional connectomes to SMs with high significance
  • We conclude that there is some shared variance between brain sub-volumes and functional connectomes, but the original canonical correlation analysis result is stronger, and is largely unchanged when regressing out the brain structure volumes

Need more features? Save interactive summary cards to your Scholarcy Library.