Understanding biophysicochemical interactions at the nano–bio interface

Rapid growth in nanotechnology is increasing the likelihood of engineered nanomaterials coming into contact with humans and the environment

Andre E. Nel; Lutz Mädler; Darrell Velegol; Tian Xia; Eric M. V. Hoek; Ponisseril Somasundaran; Fred Klaessig; Vince Castranova; Mike Thompson

2009

Scholarcy highlights

  • Rapid growth in nanotechnology is increasing the likelihood of engineered nanomaterials coming into contact with humans and the environment
  • Nanoparticles interacting with proteins, membranes, cells, DNA and organelles establish a series of nanoparticle/biological interfaces that depend on colloidal forces as well as dynamic biophysicochemical interactions
  • Support for experimental work was provided by the UC Lead Campus for Nanotoxicology Training and Research, funded by UC TSR&TP, US Public Health Service grants and the US EPA STAR award to the Southern California Particle Center
  • We are grateful for discussions and contributions provided by participants in the Biophysicochemical Interactions of Engineered Nanomaterials Workshop held at UCLA in September 2007
  • Division of NanoMedicine, David Geffen School of Medicine and California NanoSystems Institute at UCLA, Los Angeles, 90095, California, USA

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