Effect of defects on the intrinsic strength and stiffness of graphene

We report that the two-dimensional elastic modulus of graphene is maintained even at a high density of sp3-type defects

Ardavan Zandiatashbar; Gwan-Hyoung Lee; Sung Joo An; Sunwoo Lee; Nithin Mathew; Mauricio Terrones; Takuya Hayashi; Catalin R. Picu; James Hone; Nikhil Koratkar

2014

Scholarcy highlights

  • Introduction of defectsA tabletop oxygen plasma etcher was used to induce defects in the suspended graphene sheets
  • A 1 Â 1 cm array of circular wells with diameters ranging from 0.5 to 5 mm was patterned on a Si chip with a 300-nm SiO2-capping layer, by photolithography and reactive ion etching
  • Elastic stiffness and breaking force were measured by Atomic force microscope nanoindentation with a diamond AFM tip, as shown in the schematic of Fig. 1a
  • It should be noted that our AFM nanoindentation technique reveals only the spatially averaged mechanical properties of the defective graphene sheet; the indented area in our testing is at least 4,500 nm, which contains at least 86,550 carbon hexagons
  • For high-resolution imaging of vacancytype defects, suspended graphene samples exposed by the oxygen plasma were carefully scanned by AFM with ultra-sharp diamond-like carbon tip with a small tip radius of o1 nm
  • The nonlinear force versus displacement curves obtained from the AFM nanoindentation tests were used to quantitatively determine the elastic stiffness and breaking load of defective graphene following the model described in refs 2 and 3
  • The nonlinear force versus displacement curves obtained from the Atomic force microscope nanoindentation tests were used to quantitatively determine the elastic stiffness and breaking load of defective graphene following the model described in refs 2 and 3

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