Canine Models of Atopic Dermatitis: A Useful Tool with Untapped Potential

The purpose of this review is to briefly describe the clinical and immunological features of canine atopic dermatitis and to describe a few models of AD in dogs and the lessons learned from these models

Rosanna Marsella

2009

Scholarcy highlights

  • Animal models have been instrumental in gaining an insight into many aspects of the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis, from improving our understanding of the immunological mechanisms to gaining an appreciation for the importance of epicutaneous exposure to allergens
  • The biggest challenge remains in the development of a clinically relevant model that could shed light on the mechanisms behind the distribution of lesions in AD and the ‘‘atopic march.’’ mouse models have many benefits, including low cost, short time to maturity, availability of reagents, and the opportunity to evaluate the effects of specific genetic alterations, they have significant limitations in how clinically similar their disease is to naturally occurring human AD
  • It is estimated that canine AD affects, on average, 10–15% of the canine population, but it seems that AD, even in dogs, has become increasingly more common in the past decade
  • The purpose of this review is to briefly describe the clinical and immunological features of canine AD and to describe a few models of AD in dogs and the lessons learned from these models
  • It is hoped that canine models can help unravel the mystery of AD and be a useful tool for studies on pathogenesis as well as investigations using experimental treatments, in the screening process, before lengthy clinical trials are considered

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