A fruit, milk and whole grain dietary pattern is positively associated with bone mineral density in Korean healthy adults

Among Korean adults from the Healthy Twin Cohort, part of the Korean Genomic Epidemiologic Study, we identified four distinct dietary patterns, which accounted for 31.1% of the total variance in food intake

S Shin

2014

Scholarcy highlights

  • Osteoporosis is a systemic skeletal disease characterised by reduced bone mass and disrupted bone architecture, resulting in increased bone fragility and fracture risk. Osteoporosis is commonly referred to as a ‘silent disease’ because there are no symptoms until a fracture occurs
  • Four dietary patterns were identified by factor analysis, and we named them according to the food groups that had high-positive loadings: ‘Rice and kimchi’; ‘Eggs, meat and flour’; ‘Fruit, milk and whole grains’; and ‘Fast food and soda’
  • In women, compared with the lowest quartile of the ‘Fruit, milk and whole grains’ dietary pattern score, the highest quartile of this pattern showed a decreased risk of having low bone mineral density after adjustment for age, body size and energy intake
  • The BMDs of the whole arm, whole leg and whole body showed a significantly positive association with the ‘Fruit, milk and whole grains’ dietary pattern score
  • Among Korean adults from the Healthy Twin Cohort, part of the Korean Genomic Epidemiologic Study, we identified four distinct dietary patterns, which accounted for 31.1% of the total variance in food intake
  • The ‘Fruit, milk and whole grains’ dietary pattern was associated with a decreased risk of having a low BMD among Korean adults, and the associations remained after adjusting for known confounding factors
  • We identified four dietary patterns, of which the ‘Fruit, milk and whole grains’ dietary pattern, characterised by high consumption of fruits, vegetables, dairy products and whole grains, was positively associated with a reduced risk of low bone mineral density and with an increased BMD at most of the bone sites measured

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