Lipid peroxidation contributes to hydrogen peroxide induced cytotoxicity in renal epithelial cells

We have examined the role of lipid peroxidation in the cytotoxicity of H202 in oppossum kidney cells containing markedly differing amounts of cell membrane polyunsaturated fatty acids

Alice M. Sheridan; Sean Fitzpatrick; Candice Wang; David C. Wheeler; Wilfred Lieberthal

2007

Scholarcy highlights

  • Lipid peroxidation contributes to hydrogen peroxide induced cytotoxicity in renal epithelial cells
  • We demonstrate that the severity of H202-induced cell death is directly related to cell membrane Polunsaturated fatty acids content and to the degree of lipid peroxidation
  • The cell membranes of freshly isolated proximal tubules obtained from normal adult mice contained 20 1% stearic acid, 30 2% palmitic acid, 11 1% oleic acid, 7 1% linoleic acid and 23 2% arachidonic acid
  • We initially compared the PUFA content of normal mouse proximal tubules with the amount of PUFA in the membranes of mouse proximal tubular cells grown from these tubules in primary culture
  • Despite the normal PUFA content of the freshly isolated tubules, the cells that grow from these tubules are severely deficient in linoleic and arachidonic acids
  • Our findings provide novel and direct evidence that the PUFA content of cell membranes markedly influences the susceptibility of cells to H202-induced cytotoxicity and that lipid peroxidation directly contributes to this process
  • We demonstrate that the degree of lethal cell injury induced by H202 in renal cells is directly related to cell Polunsaturated fatty acids content and that lipid peroxidation plays plays an important and direct role in mediating oxidant related cytotoxicity

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