Gene expression profiling predicts clinical outcome of breast cancer

If we evaluate all 231 prognostic reporter genes, more genes belonging to these functional categories become apparent

Laura J. van 't Veer; Hongyue Dai; Marc J. van de Vijver; Yudong D. He; Augustinus A. M. Hart; Mao Mao; Hans L. Peterse; Karin van der Kooy; Matthew J. Marton; Anke T. Witteveen; George J. Schreiber; Ron M. Kerkhoven; Chris Roberts; Peter S. Linsley; René Bernards; Stephen H. Friend

2002

Scholarcy highlights

  • None of the signatures of breast cancer gene expression reported to date6±12 allow for patient-tailored therapy strategies
  • If we evaluate all 231 prognostic reporter genes, more genes belonging to these functional categories become apparent
  • The classi®er showed a comparable performance on the validation set of 19 independent sporadic tumours and con®rmed the predictive power and robustness of prognosis classi®cation using the 70 optimal marker genes
  • The prediction of the classi®er presented in Fig. 2b would indicate that women under 55 years of age who are diagnosed with lymphnode-negative breast cancer that has a poor prognosis signature have a 28-fold odds ratio to develop a distant metastasis within 5 years compared with those that have the good prognosis signature
  • This crossvalidated predictive value of our classi®er is superior to the currently available clinical and histopathological prognostic factors: high grade, tumour size greater than 2 cm, angioinvasion, age #40, and ER negative
  • We developed a method for classifying breast tumours into prognostic or diagnostic categories based on gene expression pro®les
  • M. et al Predicting the clinical status of human breast cancer by using gene expression pro®les

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