Structural Defects Play a Major Role in the Acute Lung Toxicity of Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes: Physicochemical Aspects

Carbon nanotubes have been reported to elicit toxic responses in vitro and in vivo, ascribed so far to metal contamination, CNT length, degree of oxidation, or extent of hydrophilicity

Ivana Fenoglio; Giovanna Greco; Maura Tomatis; Julie Muller; Encarnacion Raymundo-Piñero; François Béguin; Antonio Fonseca; Janos B. Nagy; Dominique Lison; Bice Fubini

2008

Scholarcy highlights

  • Carbon nanotubes have been reported to elicit toxic responses in vitro and in vivo, ascribed so far to metal contamination, CNT length, degree of oxidation, or extent of hydrophilicity
  • The Altmetric Attention Score is a quantitative measure of the attention that a research article has received online
  • To examine how structural properties may modulate the toxicity of CNT, one preparation of multiwall CNT has been modified by grinding and subsequently heating either in a vacuum at 600 °C or in an inert atmosphere at 2400 °C and by heating at 2400 °C in an inert atmosphere and subsequently grinding the thermally treated CNT
  • The original ground material exhibited a scavenging activity toward hydroxyl radicals, which was eliminated by heating at 2400 °C but restored upon grinding
  • This scavenging activity, related to the presence of defects, appears to go paired with the genotoxic and inflammatory potential of CNT reported in the companion paper
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