Parental Transfer of Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers (PBDEs) and Thyroid Endocrine Disruption in Zebrafish

We demonstrated that parental exposure to low concentrations of Polybrominated diphenyl ethers could affect thyroid hormones in the offspring and the transgenerational PBDE-induced toxicity in subsequent nonexposed generations

Liqin Yu; James C. W. Lam; Yongyong Guo; Rudolf S. S. Wu; Paul K. S. Lam; Bingsheng Zhou

2011

Scholarcy highlights

  • Polybrominated diphenyl ethers have the potential to disrupt the thyroid endocrine system
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  • In the F0 generation, exposure to DE-71 significantly increased plasma thyroxine but not 3,5,3′-triiodothyronine in females. This increased T4 was accompanied by decreased mRNA levels of corticotropin-releasing hormone and thyrotropin β-subunit in the brain
  • Decreased hatching and inhibition of growth in the F1 offspring were observed in the condition without DE-71 treatment
  • Analysis of F1 eggs indicated that parental exposure to DE-71 could result in a transfer of PBDEs and thyroid hormones to their offspring
  • We demonstrated that parental exposure to low concentrations of PBDEs could affect THs in the offspring and the transgenerational PBDE-induced toxicity in subsequent nonexposed generations
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