Insulator to Semimetal Transition in Graphene Oxide

We have extended works of Jung et al.7 and Kaiser et al.11 to provide a complete picture of transport in Graphene oxide by carrying out measurements over a wide temperature range at various degrees of reduction treatments

Goki Eda; Cecilia Mattevi; Hisato Yamaguchi; HoKwon Kim; Manish Chhowalla

2009

Scholarcy highlights

  • Graphene oxide, a chemically derived graphene, has recently triggered research interest due to its solubility in a variety of solvents and promise of large area electronics
  • Since the electrical properties of reduced GO are strongly correlated to the amount of sp bonding, which represent transport barriers, additional studies correlating the transport properties at different degrees of reduction would be useful for fundamental insight into the insulator-semi-metal transition
  • We have extended works of Jung et al. and Kaiser et al. to provide a complete picture of transport in GO by carrying out measurements over a wide temperature range at various degrees of reduction treatments
  • Results from two such hydrazine dipped r-GO samples are presented in the following discussions and are referred to as HG-A and HG-B
  • The distinct off-state observed for samples 8m, 15m, and 30m at T = 78 K suggest that the energy gap is larger for lightly reduced GO compared to extensively reduced samples such as HG-A and HG-B
  • The on/off ratios achieved in 15m and 30m samples exceed 103, which is more than an order of magnitude greater than those reported for lithographically patterned GNRs measured at comparable temperatures. This comparison suggests that the size of the band gaps in these r-GO are comparable to or greater than those of GNRs, which are of the order of few tens to few hundreds of milli-electron volts depending on their width
  • This analysis leads to an interesting result which is that reduction of Graphene oxide does not lead to delocalization of carriers but to increased number of localized states near EF at low temperatures

Need more features? Save interactive summary cards to your Scholarcy Library.