Doped Carbon Nanoparticles as a New Platform for Highly Photoluminescent Dots

We found that carbon nanoparticles may be doped with inorganic salts such as ZnO or ZnS before their surface passivation by organic molecules to achieve much higher photoluminescence quantum yields

Ya-Ping Sun

2008

Scholarcy highlights

  • There have been rapid advances in the development and applications of semiconductor quantum dots, especially for the more fluorescent core—shell dots based on CdSe nanocrystals with a wide-bandgap semiconductor shell
  • Despite their demonstrated performance and widely discussed potentials, a major limitation is their necessary use of heavy metals such as cadmium.3a,4 In the continuing search for benign alternatives, Sun and co-workers found and reported that nanosized pure carbon particles may be surface-passivated by organic molecules to exhibit bright photoluminescence in the visible with either one- or two-photon excitation
  • We found that carbon nanoparticles may be doped with inorganic salts such as ZnO or ZnS before their surface passivation by organic molecules to achieve much higher photoluminescence quantum yields
  • The results suggest that small salt-doped carbon nanoparticles represent a new platform for quantum dotlike optical nanomaterials
  • The currently available CZnO-Dots in aqueous solution are slightly less luminescent than CZnS-Dots, with observed quantum yields around 45%
  • Carbon nanoparticles from laser ablation were processed in terms of the nitric acid treatment, dialysis, and centrifugation to retain the supernatant, in which the suspended nanoparticles were generally less than 10 nm in size according to electron microscopy analyses
  • The mixture was centrifuged at 3000g, and the precipitate was retained and repeatedly washed with distilled water to obtain the ZnS-doped carbon nanoparticles

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