Binding and Condensation of Plasmid DNA onto Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes: Toward the Construction of Nanotube-Based Gene Delivery Vectors

We reported the capability of ammonium-functionalized single-walled Carbon nanotubes to penetrate human and murine cells and facilitate the delivery of plasmid DNA leading to expression of marker genes

Ravi Singh; Davide Pantarotto; David McCarthy; Olivier Chaloin; Johan Hoebeke; Charalambos D. Partidos; Jean-Paul Briand; Maurizio Prato; Alberto Bianco; Kostas Kostarelos

2005

Scholarcy highlights

  • Carbon nanotubes constitute a class of nanomaterials that possess characteristics suitable for a variety of possible applications
  • We have been exploring the potential of Functionalized CNTs as delivery vehicles of biologically active molecules in view of possible biomedical applications, including vaccination and gene delivery
  • We reported the capability of ammonium-functionalized single-walled CNTs to penetrate human and murine cells and facilitate the delivery of plasmid DNA leading to expression of marker genes
  • We study the interactions of three types of f-CNTs, ammonium-functionalized single-walled and multiwalled carbon nanotubes, and lysine-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes, with plasmid DNA
  • The results indicate that all three types of cationic carbon nanotubes are able to condense DNA to varying degrees, indicating that both nanotube surface area and charge density are critical parameters that determine the interaction and electrostatic complex formation between f-CNTs with DNA
  • Differences in the levels of gene expression were correlated with the structural and biophysical data obtained for the f-CNT:DNA complexes to suggest that large surface area leading to very efficient DNA condensation is not necessary for effective gene transfer
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