Oxide Nanoparticle Uptake in Human Lung Fibroblasts: Effects of Particle Size, Agglomeration, and Diffusion at Low Concentrations

Quantitative studies on the uptake of nanoparticles into biological systems should consider simultaneous agglomera tion, sedimentation, and diffusion at physiologically relevant concentrations to assess the corresponding risks of nanomaterials to human health

Ludwig K. Limbach; Yuchun Li; Robert N. Grass; Tobias J. Brunner; Marcel A. Hintermann; Martin Muller; Detlef Gunther; Wendelin J. Stark

2005

Scholarcy highlights

  • Quantitative studies on the uptake of nanoparticles into biological systems should consider simultaneous agglomera tion, sedimentation, and diffusion at physiologically relevant concentrations to assess the corresponding risks of nanomaterials to human health
  • The Altmetric Attention Score is a quantitative measure of the attention that a research article has received online
  • The transport and uptake of industrially important cerium oxide nanoparticles, into human lung fibroblasts is measured in vitro after exposing thoroughly characterized particle suspensions to a fibroblast cell culture for particles of four separate size fractions and concentrations ranging from 100 ng g-1 to 100 μg g-1 of fluid
  • The unexpected findings at such low but physiologically relevant concentrations reveal a strong dependence of the amount of incorporated ceria on particle size, while nanoparticle number density or total particle surface area are of minor importance
  • Comparison of the colloid stability of a series of oxide nanoparticles reveals that untreated oxide suspensions rapidly agglomerate in biological fluids and allows the conclusion that the presented transport and uptake kinetics at low concentrations may be extended to other industrially relevant materials
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