Trace Analysis of Bromate, Chlorate, Iodate, and Perchlorate in Natural and Bottled Waters

The presence of certain oxyhalides in drinking water has become a major issue for the water industry

Shane A. Snyder; Brett J. Vanderford; David J. Rexing

2005

Scholarcy highlights

  • The presence of certain oxyhalides in drinking water has become a major issue for the water industry
  • Since water samples were injected directly after pretreatment and no concentration/dilution steps were performed, the method detection limit is synonymous with the instrument detection limit
  • Sulfate will be present at concentrations much higher than those of the oxyhalide anions studied here
  • Total sample preparation and analysis can be completed in less than 30 min, compared to much longer times to run multiple existing methods. This method requires sample volumes of less than 1 mL for direct injection, which is suitable for most drinking waters
  • From the limited data shown here, it appears that perchlorate is a ubiquitous component of natural waters at trace levels
  • The gradient was as follows: 5% B held for 3.5 min, increased linearly to 80% by 10 min, and held for 3 min
  • It is interesting to note that three bottled waters exceed the EPA bromate regulation of 10 μg/L, with one sample at nearly 8-fold greater than the bromate maximum contaminant limit
  • It is possible to discover contaminants previously considered absent in a variety of water types

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