Biomedical Applications of Graphene and Graphene Oxide

In this Account, we review recent efforts to apply graphene and graphene oxides to biomedical research and a few different approaches to prepare graphene materials designed for biomedical applications

Chul Chung; Young-Kwan Kim; Dolly Shin; Soo-Ryoon Ryoo; Byung Hee Hong; Dal-Hee Min

2013

Scholarcy highlights

  • Graphene has unique mechanical, electronic, and optical properties, which researchers have used to develop novel electronic materials including transparent conductors and ultrafast transistors
  • Article Views are the COUNTER-compliant sum of full text article downloads since November 2008 across all institutions and individuals
  • Graphene is expanding its territory beyond electronic and chemical applications toward biomedical areas such as precise biosensing through graphene-quenched fluorescence, graphene-enhanced cell differentiation and growth, and graphene-assisted laser desorption/ionization for mass spectrometry. In this Account, we review recent efforts to apply graphene and graphene oxides to biomedical research and a few different approaches to prepare graphene materials designed for biomedical applications
  • Because of its excellent aqueous processability, amphiphilicity, surface functionalizability, surface enhanced Raman scattering, and fluorescence quenching ability, GO chemically exfoliated from oxidized graphite is considered a promising material for biological applications
  • The lack of acceptable classification standards of graphene derivatives based on chemical and physical properties has hindered the biological application of graphene derivatives
  • For the development graphene-based therapeutics, researchers will need to build on the standardization of graphene derivatives and study the biofunctionalization of graphene to clearly understand how cells respond to exposure to graphene derivatives
  • Several challenging issues remain, initial promising results in these areas point toward significant potential for graphene derivatives in biomedical research

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