Methane mitigation in ruminants: from microbe to the farm scale

Owing to the importance and the rapid evolution of knowledge in this research area, we present in this paper an updated review of proved and some potential mitigation options, together with their known mode of action

C. Martin

2009

Scholarcy highlights

  • Methane is one of the three main greenhouse gases, together with carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide
  • Owing to the importance and the rapid evolution of knowledge in this research area, we present in this paper an updated review of proved and some potential mitigation options, together with their known mode of action
  • A bacteriocin obtained from a rumen bacterium, bovicin HC5, decreased CH4 production in vitro up to 50% without inducing methanogens’ adaptation
  • The removal of protozoa from the rumen has been shown to reduce CH4 production by up to 50% depending on the diet
  • Polyunsaturated fatty acid are considered beneficial on human health and their use in diets, which results in a limited increase of these FAs in milk and meat, could be proposed as a way for CH4 abatement provided that supplementation levels do not decrease feed efficiency or performance of animals
  • When additives or lipid supplementation are used to decrease enteric CH4, it can be thought that their use does not modify to a large extent the emission of non-enteric CH4 and that of other GHG related to animal production
  • According to De Boer, practices aiming to limit environmental pollution in nonorganic systems but with a high animal productivity may result in lower emissions per kg milk than organic system

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