The role of thyroid hormones in stress response of fish

Thyroxine and triiodothyronine, the principal thyroid hormones secreted from the hypothalamic–pituitary–thyroid axis, produce a plethora of physiologic actions in fish

M.C. Subhash Peter

2011

Scholarcy highlights

  • Thyroxine and triiodothyronine, the principal thyroid hormones secreted from the hypothalamic–pituitary–thyroid axis, produce a plethora of physiologic actions in fish
  • As primary stress hormones and the end products of hypothalamic–pituitary–interrenal and brain–sympathetic–chromaffin axes, cortisol and adrenaline exert its actions on its target tissues where it promote and integrate osmotic and metabolic competence
  • Despite possessing specific osmoregulatory and metabolic actions at cellular and whole-body levels, THs may fine-tune these processes in accordance with the actions of hormones like cortisol and adrenaline
  • Evidences are presented that THs can modify the pattern and magnitude of stress response in fishes as it modifies either its own actions or the actions of stress hormones
  • Even though it is hard to define these interactions, the magnitude of stress response in fish has been shown to be modified by the changes in the status of THs, pointing to its functional relationship with endocrine stress axes with the interrenal axis
  • Thyroid hormones are released from hypothalamic–pitutary–thyroid axis of fish. ► THs have both osmoregulatory and metabolic actions in fish. ► Interrenal and chromaffin cell axes produce cortisol and adrenaline which direct stress response in fish. ► Thyroid axis interacts with interrenal and chromaffin cell axes. ► Changes in the THs status modify the pattern of stress response in fish
  • ► Changes in the thyroid hormones status modify the pattern of stress response in fish

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