Transcranial cerebellar direct current stimulation (tcDCS): Motor control, cognition, learning and emotions

We proposed a simpler technique than transcranial magnetic stimulation for non-invasive cerebellar neuromodulation namely, transcranial cerebellar direct current stimulation. Transcranial cerebellar direct current stimulation is based upon the same principle as transcranial direct current stimulation: weak direct currents below 2–3 mA delivered for minutes over the scalp through a pair of surface electrodes induce prolonged changes in the underlying brain areas

Roberta Ferrucci; Alberto Priori

2013

Scholarcy highlights

  • Centro Clinico per la Neurostimolazione, le Neurotecnologie ed i Disordini del Movimento, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda, Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, via F
  • The need for a non-invasive tool to influence cerebellar function in normal and pathological conditions led researchers to develop transcranial cerebellar direct current stimulation. Transcranial cerebellar direct current stimulation, like transcranial direct current stimulation, depends on the principle that weak direct currents delivered at around 2 mA for minutes over the cerebellum through surface electrodes induce prolonged changes in cerebellar function. tcDCS modulates several cerebellar skills in humans including motor control, learning and emotional processing. tcDCS influences the cerebello-brain interactions induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation, walking adaptation, working memory and emotional recognition
  • We proposed a simpler technique than TMS for non-invasive cerebellar neuromodulation namely, transcranial cerebellar direct current stimulation. tcDCS is based upon the same principle as transcranial direct current stimulation: weak direct currents below 2–3 mA delivered for minutes over the scalp through a pair of surface electrodes induce prolonged changes in the underlying brain areas
  • We investigated whether tcDCS influences procedural learning as measured by the serial reaction time task, in which subjects make key press responses to visual cues
  • Extending these findings to patients, Rogers et al suggested that the neuropathological changes in the cerebellum commonly observed in autism, schizophrenia, and other cognitive disorders could result in aberrant dopaminergic activity in the medial prefrontal cortex
  • The main finding in this study is that anodal tcDCS influenced procedural learning as indexed by the SRTT in healthy subjects
  • Dopamine and glutamatergic dysregulation may be associated with deficits in working memory, reward and motivation and tcDCS might readjust dopaminergic system in patients
  • Dopamine and glutamatergic dysregulation may be associated with deficits in working memory, reward and motivation and Transcranial cerebellar direct current stimulation might readjust dopaminergic system in patients

Need more features? Save interactive summary cards to your Scholarcy Library.