Modulating ROS to overcome multidrug resistance in cancer

The successful treatment of cancer has significantly improved as a result of targeted therapy and immunotherapy

Qingbin Cui; Jing-Quan Wang; Yehuda G. Assaraf; Liang Ren; Pranav Gupta; Liuya Wei; Charles R. Ashby; Dong-Hua Yang; Zhe-Sheng Chen

2018

Scholarcy highlights

  • The successful treatment of cancer has significantly improved as a result of targeted therapy and immunotherapy
  • During chemotherapy, cancer cells evolve and can acquire “multidrug resistance”, which significantly limits the efficacy of cancer treatment and impacts patient survival and quality of life
  • Numerous studies suggest that compounds modulating cellular reactive oxidative species levels can enhance MDR cancer cell death and sensitize MDR cancer cells to certain chemotherapeutic drugs
  • We discuss the critical and targetable redox-regulating enzymes, including mitochondrial electron transport chain complexes, NADPH oxidases, enzymes related to glutathione metabolism, glutamate/cystine antiporter xCT, thioredoxin reductases, nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2, and their roles in regulating cellular ROS levels, drug resistance as well as their clinical significance
  • Compounds that are efficacious in modulating reactive oxidative species generation represent a prominent class of drug candidates that warrants evaluation in clinical trials for patients harboring MDR cancers

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