Human health risks associated with antimicrobial-resistant enterococci and Staphylococcus aureus on poultry meat

This review provides an overview of the human health risks associated with the occurrence of these opportunistic human pathogens on poultry meat with particular focus on the risk of food-borne transmission of antimicrobial resistance

V. Bortolaia; C. Espinosa-Gongora; L. Guardabassi

2015

Scholarcy highlights

  • Enterococci and staphylococci are frequent contaminants on poultry meat and well-established opportunistic pathogens in human medicine
  • E. faecalis and E. faecium are ranked as the third cause of bacteraemia in Europe and in America accounting for approximately 11%–13% of all bacteraemia cases
  • The present review provides state-of-the-art knowledge of the human health risks associated with the occurrence of these opportunistic pathogens on poultry meat with particular focus on the contribution of antimicrobial-resistant strains of poultry origin to human infections
  • Chicken and to a greater extent turkey meat are often contaminated with E. faecalis, E. faecium and S. aureus, the bacterial loads are generally low and the risk that humans may become colonized after ingestion or handling of contaminated poultry meat can be prevented by proper cooking and kitchen hygiene
  • Food-borne colonization of the human gut is more plausible for enterococci than for S. aureus but the risk that multidrug-resistant enterococci of poultry origin may cause infections concerns mainly E. faecalis
  • Colonization by methicillin-resistant S. aureus and other multidrugresistant S. aureus after ingestion of contaminated meat is not supported by scientific evidence
  • Even though in theory meat handling is a possible transmission route and there is still a substantial uncertainty with respect to the prevalence of infections caused by methicillin-resistant S. aureus outside the hospital, epidemiological data from countries where MRSA is notifiable and more information is available on the MRSA types causing communityacquired infections indicate that this risk is low for the general population

Need more features? Save interactive summary cards to your Scholarcy Library.