Evidence for thyroid endocrine disruption in wild fish in San Francisco Bay, California, USA. Relationships to contaminant exposures

This study provided an initial characterization of thyroid endocrine-related effects and their relationship to accumulated contaminants in two indigenous fish species sampled from different San Franicsco Bay Area study sites

Navdeep K. Brar; Claire Waggoner; Jesus A. Reyes; Russell Fairey; Kevin M. Kelley

2009

Scholarcy highlights

  • It is well documented that many coastal and estuarine environments adjacent to developed and industrialized urban centers, such as the San Francisco Bay Area, are significantly contaminated by anthropogenic chemicals
  • This study provided an initial characterization of thyroid endocrine-related effects and their relationship to accumulated contaminants in two indigenous fish species sampled from different San Franicsco Bay Area study sites
  • The changes in thyroid endocrine parameters were significantly correlated with hepatic concentrations of certain environmental contaminants
  • A large number of polychlorinated biphenyl congeners, both co-planar and non-co-planar, exhibited significant inverse correlations with T4 levels in the fish, while in contrast, T3 and T3/T4 ratio were positively correlated with PCB exposures
  • The positive correlation between T3/T4 ratio and PCBs supports the hypothesis that environmental PCBs may alter T4 deiodination or turnover, actions of PCBs reported in laboratory experiments
  • Some relationships between chlorinated pesticides including DDT and chlordanes, but fewer relationships with PAHs, were observed. These findings indicate that the thyroid endocrine system is exhibiting alterations associated with different aquatic environments in the San Francisco Bay Area, which are significantly related to current-day exposures of the fish to contaminant chemicals such as PCBs
  • These findings indicate that the thyroid endocrine system is exhibiting alterations associated with different aquatic environments in the San Francisco Bay Area, which are significantly related to current-day exposures of the fish to contaminant chemicals such as polychlorinated biphenyl

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