Vitamin e kinetics and the function of tocopherol regulatory proteins

Plasma and tissue α-tocopherol concentrations are remarkably stable, which suggests that they are regulated. α-Tocopherol transfer protein, tocopherol-associated protein, and tocopherol-binding protein bind α-tocopherol. These proteins might function as tocopherol regulatory proteins, only tocopherol transfer protein has been shown to influence plasma and tissue α-tocopherol concentrations

David H. Blatt; Scott W. Leonard; Maret G. Traber

2002

Scholarcy highlights

  • Plasma and tissue α-tocopherol concentrations are remarkably stable, which suggests that they are regulated. α-Tocopherol transfer protein, tocopherol-associated protein, and tocopherol-binding protein bind α-tocopherol. These proteins might function as tocopherol regulatory proteins, only tocopherol transfer protein has been shown to influence plasma and tissue α-tocopherol concentrations
  • Tissue α-tocopherol concentrations likely depend on tocopherol regulatory protein function and tissue lipid content, vitamin E uptake and efflux, oxidative stress, and interactions between vitamin E and other antioxidants
  • Intracellular trafficking of vitamin E might occur in conjunction with membrane recycling because membrane constituents rapidly recycle between the plasma membrane and intracellular endocytic compartments
  • ScienceDirect ® is a registered trademark of Elsevier B.V

Need more features? Save interactive summary cards to your Scholarcy Library.