Parkinson disease: etiology, pathogenesis and future of gene therapy

We investigated the differential vulnerability of various brain regions to generalized inhibition of complex I, induced by subcutaneous rotenone injections for the duration of 1, 3 and 7 days in both rats and mice

Barkur S. Shastry

2002

Scholarcy highlights

  • Multifactorial, called complex or common diseases, provide challenging problems for geneticists because most cases are believed to result from the combined action of multiple genes and environmental factors such as diet, toxins and exposure to drugs
  • An attempt is made to highlight some of the progress that has been accomplished in understanding the complex disorder Parkinson disease
  • We investigated the differential vulnerability of various brain regions to generalized inhibition of complex I, induced by subcutaneous rotenone injections for the duration of 1, 3 and 7 days in both rats and mice
  • Our results suggest that inhibition of Regulator of G-protein signaling 4 as a nondopaminergic target for PD should be approached with caution
  • There is considerable evidence that the central renin–angiotensin system might be linked to PD, and it has been demonstrated by several studies that microglial activation and/or NADPH-derived superoxide/peroxide have an important role in neurotoxin-induced dopaminergic cells degeneration in different animal models of PD
  • A multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that presence of subjective cognitive decline and higher Unified PD Rating Scale motor score of 20 or more were risk factors for incident mild cognitive impairment
  • We found no difference in the expression of glucocerebrosidase or the CASP8 and FADD-like apoptosis regulator
  • These provide a basis for tenable understanding of neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson disease through functional genomic analysis and pharmacological manipulation for the discovery of previously unknown genetic and environmental risk factors

Need more features? Save interactive summary cards to your Scholarcy Library.