Interventions to prevent and reduce physician burnout: a systematic review and meta-analysis

We considered potential eligibility of the abstracts and extracted data from eligible studies using a standardised form

Colin P West; Liselotte N Dyrbye; Patricia J Erwin; Tait D Shanafelt

2016

Scholarcy highlights

  • Physician burnout has reached epidemic levels, as documented in national studies of both physicians in training and practising physicians
  • We considered potential eligibility of the abstracts and extracted data from eligible studies using a standardised form
  • The literature indicates that both individual-focused and structural or organisational strategies can result in clinically meaningful reductions in burnout among physicians
  • Further research is needed to establish which interventions are most effective in specific populations, as well as how individual and organisational solutions might be combined to deliver even greater improvements in physician wellbeing than those achieved with individual solutions
  • Burnout affects more than half of practising physicians and is on the rise
  • That evidence suggests that burnout negatively affects physicians’ effectiveness and availability to patients, as well as patient safety, physicians, health-care organisations, and the public are justifiably worried about quality of patient care and the health of health-care institutions

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