Fecal Lactate and Ulcerative Colitis

In preliminary studies we reported an abnormal fecal organic ionogram in ulcerative colitis, mainly characterized by an increase in lactate

Piero Vernia; Renzo Caprilli; Giovanni Latella; Fabrizio Barbetti; Fabio M. Magliocca; Mauro Cittadini

2016

Scholarcy highlights

  • Impaired metabolism of short-chain fatty acids, as well as a modified fecal ionogram, have been reported in ulcerative colitis
  • In preliminary studies we reported an abnormal fecal organic ionogram in ulcerative colitis, mainly characterized by an increase in lactate
  • In our laboratory mucosal alterations strictly resembling those of human UC were induced in rats by the infusion of lactic acid at a concentration of 25 mM/L, which is of the same order as those found in the stools of patients with UC
  • As far as the organic component is concerned, fecal SCFAs are high in patients with mild disease, do not differ from controls in moderate disease, and are significantly low in severe cases
  • Lactate, which is present in negligible concentrations in the fecal water of normal subjects and patients with quiescent colitis, was found to be significantly increased in patients with active disease, reaching very high concentrations in severe colitis
  • Severe colitis is characterized by low fecal pH, reduced excretion of bicarbonate, low concentrations of SCFAs, and markedly increased lactic acid

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