Single and mixture adsorption of clofibric acid, tetracycline and paracetamol onto Activated carbon developed from cotton cloth residue

Our results showed that the adsorbents prepared by chemical activation in the presence of phosphoric acid and pyrolysis at 600 °C lead to microporous materials with high surface areas

Nassima Boudrahem; Sandrine Delpeux-Ouldriane; Lamia Khenniche; Farouk Boudrahem; Farida Aissani-Benissad; Mickaël Gineys

2017

Scholarcy highlights

  • Pharmaceuticals drugs are a class of emerging environmental contaminants that are extensively and increasingly being used in human and veterinary medicine, agriculture and aquaculture practices
  • Our results showed that the adsorbents prepared by chemical activation in the presence of phosphoric acid and pyrolysis at 600 °C lead to microporous materials with high surface areas
  • It was reported that H3PO4 activation of biomass efficiently produced microporous carbon with greater surface area compared to mesoporous structure with higher pore volumes and diameter by ZnCl2 activation
  • This study presents a simple process for the development of a novel activated carbon from cotton waste with good physico-chemical properties allowing the effective elimination of several types of molecules of pharmaceutical origin
  • This study investigated the feasibility of preparation of a new activated carbon form cotton cloth residues, as a low-cost and efficient adsorbent for pharmaceuticals compounds adsorption
  • The adsorbent removed up to 70% of the simulated effluent when using the Jacuí river as the sample
  • The results showed that the increase of carbonization temperature would lead to the reduction of mesopores but the increase of micropores for cotton-based activated carbon fiber; the embedment of phosphoric acid and its derivatives into the carbon layers contributed to the formation of pore structure for CACF; specific surface area of CACF can be enlarged by increasing the concentration of phosphoric acid
  • Two activated carbons were modified with iron benzoate and cobalt, and with iron oxalate and cobalt to study the adsorption process of two pharmaceutical molecules named amoxicillin and paracetamol

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