Mechanisms to explain the reverse perivascular transport of solutes out of the brain

Experimental studies and observations in the human brain indicate that interstitial fluid and solutes, such as amyloid-β(Aβ), are eliminated from grey matter of the brain along pericapillary and periarterial pathways

D. Schley; R. Carare-Nnadi; C.P. Please; V.H. Perry; R.O. Weller

2005

Scholarcy highlights

  • Experimental studies and observations in the human brain indicate that interstitial fluid and solutes, such as amyloid-β(Aβ), are eliminated from grey matter of the brain along pericapillary and periarterial pathways
  • What constitutes the motive force for such transport within blood vessel walls, which is in the opposite direction to blood flow
  • A mathematical model is constructed in order to test the hypothesis that perivascular drainage of interstitial fluid and solutes out of brain tissue is driven by pulsations of the blood vessel walls
  • It is assumed that drainage occurs through a thin layer between astrocytes and endothelial cells or between smooth muscle cells
  • The model suggests that, during each pulse cycle, there are periods when fluid and solutes are driven along perivascular spaces in the reverse direction to the flow of blood
  • These factors may play a role in the pathogenesis of cerebral amyloid angiopathy and in the accumulation of Aβ in the brain in Alzheimer's disease

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