Remission in depressed outpatients: More than just symptom resolution?

In the present report from the Rhode Island Methods to Improve Diagnostic Assessment and Services project we examined the independent and additive association between level of severity of depressive symptoms and functional impairment in predicting depressed patients’ subjective evaluation of their remission status

Mark Zimmerman; Joseph B. McGlinchey; Michael A. Posternak; Michael Friedman; Daniela Boerescu; Naureen Attiullah

2007

Scholarcy highlights

  • In treatment studies of depression remission is defined according to scores on symptom severity scales
  • The return of normal functioning should be as fundamental to the concept of remission as is symptom resolution because the presence of both symptoms and impaired functioning are core constructs in the diagnosis of mental disorders
  • In the present report from the Rhode Island Methods to Improve Diagnostic Assessment and Services project we examined the independent and additive association between level of severity of depressive symptoms and functional impairment in predicting depressed patients’ subjective evaluation of their remission status
  • Functional impairment from depression, and quality of life were significantly and highly intercorrelated, and each was significantly associated with remission status
  • In treatment studies of depression remission is narrowly defined in terms of symptom resolution
  • Our results support broadening the concept of remission beyond symptom levels to include assessments of functioning and quality of life

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