Green thinking but thoughtless buying? An empirical extension of the value-attitude-behaviour hierarchy in sustainable clothing

The findings provide key implications for researchers and practitioners regarding fashion industry sustainability

Kathleen Jacobs; Lars Petersen; Jacob Hörisch; Dirk Battenfeld

2018

Scholarcy highlights

  • Public attention paid to sustainability in clothing has risen considerably during the past years
  • Based on a large sample of female German consumers, a structural equation model is estimated to assess the magnitude of the attitude-behaviour gap and the impact of possible enablers of, and barriers to, sustainable clothing purchase behaviour
  • Environmental pollution in garment manufacturing caused by an excessive utilisation of chemicals and the transportation of non-domestically produced textiles are further relevant sustainability issues in the clothing industry
  • By developing and empirically testing a model of sustainable clothing purchase behaviour, this article deepens the understanding of the attitude-behaviour gap in sustainable clothing
  • Based on a large sample of female German consumers, a structural equation modeling was estimated to assess the magnitude of the ABG and the impact of possible enablers of, and barriers to, purchase behaviour
  • The sustainable clothing sector is still a niche segment with a market share of eco-labelled textiles of not more than 3.7% in 2013
  • The study contributes to the existing literature by confirming the applicability of the theory of planned behavior and the value-attitude-behaviour hierarchy as well as suggesting a robust predictive framework by using artificial neural network for green apparel purchase intention
  • This research did not receive any specific grant from funding agencies in the public, commercial, or not-for-profit sectors

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