Gender discrimination in China: Experimental evidence from the job market for college graduates

We examine the gender discrimination in the initial stage of hiring for college graduates in china using the correspondence method

Jian Zhang; Songqing Jin; Tao Li; Haigang Wang

2021

Scholarcy highlights

  • We examine the gender discrimination in the initial stage of hiring for college graduates in china using the correspondence method
  • We find a female applicant is 7.6% less likely to receive a callback than a male applicant, other things being equal
  • This paper examines employment-related gender discrimination during the initial stages of a hiring process
  • By examining firms’ responses to fictitious resumes with randomly generated information on gender and other key attributes of applicants, this study is able to separate the effect of gender on a student's potential for getting an on-site interview from the confounding effects of other factors
  • The findings reveal that, with all other factors remaining constant, female applicants, on average, are less likely to be invited by hiring firms to on-site interviews as compared with their male counterparts
  • While the finding that the quality of a job candidate does not reduce gender discrimination offers some evidence to support a taste-based discrimination view, we do not have enough evidence to support a statistical discrimination view

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