Functional diversity in arbuscular mycorrhiza – the role of gene expression, phosphorous nutrition and symbiotic efficiency

We suggest that differential expression of symbiosis-associated genes among different arbuscular mycorrhiza associations is a phenotypic response to the different fungal and plant genotypes involved and the environment they inhabit; functional diversity is the rule rather than the exception and necessitates carefully replicated experiments that combine close observation of morphology, physiological traits and gene expression

Nadja Feddermann; Roger Finlay; Thomas Boller; Malin Elfstrand

2009

Scholarcy highlights

  • Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi are of great ecological importance, since arbuscular mycorrhiza is the most widespread plant symbiosis and often improves plant productivity and resistance to nutrient stress
  • Recent studies collectively indicate that there exists a functional diversity in AM, as different combinations of host plant and AMF have different impacts on the morphology, nutritional status, symbiotic efficiency and gene expression patterns in the symbiosis
  • We suggest that differential expression of symbiosis-associated genes among different AM associations is a phenotypic response to the different fungal and plant genotypes involved and the environment they inhabit; functional diversity is the rule rather than the exception and necessitates carefully replicated experiments that combine close observation of morphology, physiological traits and gene expression
  • We suggest that differential expression of symbiosis-associated genes among different arbuscular mycorrhiza associations is a phenotypic response to the different fungal and plant genotypes involved and the environment they inhabit; functional diversity is the rule rather than the exception and necessitates carefully replicated experiments that combine close observation of morphology, physiological traits and gene expression

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