Stop and smell the fungi: Fungal volatile metabolites are overlooked signals involved in fungal interaction with plants

This review focuses on the role of fungal Volatile organic compound in affecting plant growth, development, stress resistance, or combinations of these traits

Ningxiao Li

2016

Scholarcy highlights

  • In a rather simplistic and anthropocentric manner, plant-associated microbes can be classified as„beneficial, detrimental, or unknown‟ based on their effects on plant growth and health.Microbes secrete diverse classes of molecules that directly or indirectly affect plant growth, development, productivity and overall health
  • One well documented class of secreted molecules includes phytohormones, such as indole-3-acetic acid, cytokinins and gibberellins, and molecules that mimic phytohormones, such as coronatine produced by Pseudomonas syringae and methylated cytokinins released by Rhodococcus fascians
  • This review focuses on the role of fungal Volatile organic compound in affecting plant growth, development, stress resistance, or combinations of these traits
  • VOCs produced by soil-borne fungi have been shown to enhance plant growth and/or defense againstbiotic stress
  • Because relatively few studies have considered fungal VOCs as the influential signal regulating changes in plant physiology, several critical questions remain mostly unanswered: a) Which fungal VOCs enhance plant growth or stress resistance?; b) Do same VOC(s) affect both traits?. How do they manage to increase plant growth while potentially diverting resources to enhance defense?; c) How are such VOCs perceived by plants?; d) Which plant signaling pathways and downstream cellular processes are involved?; and e) How does VOC production contribute to fungal biology and ecology in association with plants?
  • Systemic resistance induced by volatile organic compounds emitted by plant growthpromoting fungi in Arabidopsis thaliana
  • Endophytic fungi produce gibberellins and indoleacetic acid and promotes host-plant growth during stress

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