Pride and prejudice: Different responses to migrant information among different identity groups

This study introduced psychological adjustment cost into a behavioral model for identity and individual attitude change

Ming Lu; Ziyang Yu; Qingyi Ji

2021

Scholarcy highlights

  • Previous studies have examined how information intervention affects intergroup prejudice and conflict
  • This study introduced psychological adjustment cost into a behavioral model for identity and individual attitude change
  • The model predicts that changes in attitude are related to an individual’s initial identity, and the same information can either change or reinforce initial attitudes
  • We used a survey to explore whether information about migration could change the attitudes of Shanghai residents toward interregional migrants to their city
  • We found that after reading neutrally described information about the benefits of internal migration, the attitudes of non-native interviewees toward immigrants became more positive while those of native Shanghai residents became more negative
  • We found that young, well-educated people developed more positive attitudes about immigrants after reading the information

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