Effects of acute and subchronic exposures to waterborne selenite on the physiological stress response and oxidative stress indicators in juvenile rainbow trout

These experiments show, for the first time, that exposure to waterborne selenite up to 0.1 mg/L, activates the physiological stress response in fish but does not impair cortisol secretion after 30 days

L.L. Miller; F. Wang; V.P. Palace; A. Hontela

2007

Scholarcy highlights

  • These experiments show, for the first time, that exposure to waterborne selenite up to 0.1 mg/L, activates the physiological stress response in fish but does not impair cortisol secretion after 30 days
  • Selenium is an essential element that may bioaccumulate to toxic levels
  • The major toxicity symptom is larval teratogenic deformities, but little is known about the effect of Se on other systems such as the physiological stress response and oxidative stress
  • To test the hypothesis that Se is a chemical stressor that causes toxicity through oxidative stress, juvenile rainbow trout were exposed to waterborne sodium selenite, and physiological stress response and stress-related parameters and hepatic oxidative stress indicators were measured after 96 h and 30 days
  • The decrease in reduced glutathione in juvenile rainbow trout subjected to the acute sodium selenite exposure suggests that oxidative stress may play an important role in the effects of Se in fish

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