Long-term effects of eight soil health treatments to control plant-parasitic nematodes and Verticillium dahliae in agro-ecosystems

We demonstrated that grass–clover, biofumigation, Cultivit and compost are not effective alternatives for chemical control yet and further development is needed

G.W. Korthals; T.C. Thoden; W. van den Berg; J.H.M. Visser

2014

Scholarcy highlights

  • Grass–clover, biofumigation, Cultivit and compost were not effective alternatives yet
  • No negative side effects on soil suppressiveness or non-target soil organisms. These treatments could be implemented in arable crop rotations worldwide
  • We demonstrated that grass–clover, biofumigation, Cultivit and compost are not effective alternatives for chemical control yet and further development is needed
  • The biggest increases of more than 60% were found for the treatments with chitin
  • It was demonstrated that these yield increases were probably less influenced by changes in chemical soil properties, but the consequence of changes in the soil biota, in this case especially the effective control of P. penetrans and V. dahliae
  • It has been demonstrated that most of these soil health treatments could already be implemented in an arable crop rotation and probably adapted for many areas of the world where other alternatives, such as solarisation or soil flooding, are not feasible or too risky

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