427 Music in Emergent Settings: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Our findings indicate that live preferential music has the potential to reduce systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and heart rate within two hours of the initial intervention, may have a long-term effect on reduction in these indicators up to 6 hours post LPM exposure, and may reduce the need for analgesia in the emergency department environment

J. Tyndall; M. Kerrigan; M.A. Baker Chowdhury; M.-C. Elie; S. Gul; M.P. Balakrishnan; J. Sonke

2017

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  • From May to October 2015, a total of 855 subjects were enrolled in a double blind randomized controlled trial and were consented, enrolled, and randomly assigned to either an intervention group who listened to live preferential music or a control group who did not receive LPM
  • Music interventions were administered by trained UF Health Arts in Medicine Musicians in Residence
  • Interventions were conducted on alternating days over a 20-week period
  • A 32.8% average reduction in administration of morphine equivalents was found among intervention patients
  • Our findings indicate that LPM has the potential to reduce systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and heart rate within two hours of the initial intervention, may have a long-term effect on reduction in these indicators up to 6 hours post LPM exposure, and may reduce the need for analgesia in the emergency department environment
  • Our findings indicate that live preferential music has the potential to reduce systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and heart rate within two hours of the initial intervention, may have a long-term effect on reduction in these indicators up to 6 hours post LPM exposure, and may reduce the need for analgesia in the emergency department environment

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